I love peacocks! The feathers come from a friend's birds just outside of Moultrie, Georgia

I love peacocks! The feathers come from a friend's birds just outside of Moultrie, Georgia

 Final touches before picture time!

Final touches before picture time!

 Arches are like a giant wreath to me and I LOVE doing them!

Arches are like a giant wreath to me and I LOVE doing them!

 

I have been making wreaths since I can remember. When I was little, I would help my mother gather pine, cut the trumpets of dried pitcher plants or brave the prickly pinecones- all gleaned from our beautiful woods in Southern Georgia. Some years I would even hop in the canoe and make my way out to the lily pads to snag a few of the seed pods- those were my favorite. All of these interesting materials would be woven, wired or tucked into our Christmas wreaths or strewn along the mantle for Christmas decorations.

As I grew older, I would watch berries ripen on my drive home, seek out variegated holly bushes to plant, or nurture my father's kumquat trees- all for materials to make that perfect wreath every year.

When I moved to the Boone, NC area in 2008, I made hand wrapped, double sided wreaths out of Fraser Fir at a local Christmas tree farm. That year, when I finished filling all of those orders, I made my own. It had all of the new materials I'd discovered on the roadsides and woods of my new home, plus my favorite golden evergreen, Chamaecyparis 'Crippsii'. From that wreath, a little company was born.

Our unique decorative wreaths are handmade in the Blue Ridge Mountains using local materials, including fraser fir, white pine, rose hips, and holly berries. Our trademark accents of chartreuse evergreen brighten many of the designs. Magnolia is also a very popular material and since not many grow in our high elevations, I head off the mountain. A nursery in the middle of the state lets me get all I could possibly need from trees that have gotten too big to dig and replant. I have at it there, and with a helper, snap the tips of almost 2000 pieces every season. In return, my grower friend's wives get to pick any wreath they want as trade.

 

This is what it looks like at our farm right now via Instagram!